Death with Dignity, and End of Catholicism

Every white space on a screen should occasion brilliant flashes of that fabled neural condition known as “writer’s block.” Rather than being a sad condition of afflicted depressives, “writer’s block” is the accurate understanding that we live in en epoch of Information Overload, with a new level of atmosphere manufactured by the endless, heedless, mono-focused eruption of cultural thought-crackers.

We are surrounded by omnipresent culture, blogs, books, writings, mansplainers, family-obsessives, vapid bullshitarians, self-important auto-designees of artistic superiority, and a few more categories that we try to safely ignore. Keep clam, as the British saying goes, though, there should always a point to what any of us looses into the ether.

There may be social horror by the ass-bucketload awaiting humanity, even the rich Eurocentric types, but the dramatic reduction in western religiosity is shifting a few corners of political governance to more humane practice. The hideous, spectacularly corrupt (always extracting money form the world’s poor, never writing checks to them) and malevolent  entity known as the Catholic Church, from whose clutches I easily escaped after youthful familial entanglement, has been one of the prime causes of withholding the great palliative benefit of doctor-assisted suicide in the vast majority of the US, as a remarkable short episode of Vice on HBO illustrated. Boomers are not going to permit this fanatical fundamentalist sect to ruin the dying stage of life for them – the death-with-dignity movement will expand from its present five states. Give it some time, but in few years, in 5 or 10, if you or I, part of the over-privileged USA, know that we face an imminent death from a terminal condition, ain’t no deluded, suffering -and-destruction-wielding priest gonna get in our way, nor their irrational adherents.   Keep clam, and carry big sticks.

4 Comments

  1. Brilliantly passionate (if a little aggressive) writing here.
    I wonder if euthanasia will ever gain traction. There’s such insane anti-euthanasia rhetoric, that I think a lot of people won’t even engage in the conversation.

    As a side note, the only typo I noticed is that, twice, you wrote “keep clam”

    1. Yeah, I admit to some over the top stuff in this post – I’ll admit there’s room for some expository nuance in the Catholic thing, but there’s some real bad there.
      Today, I was driving behind a car in the US that had nothing adorning it but the “Keep Calm” bumpersticker. Once, I think in Thailand, there was an advertisement for “Dead Clam,” a movie at the time – “Dead Calm.” In doing the typo twice, I was trying to signal my utter boredom with the dumb phrase.
      I think you are absolutely right that ” a lot of people won’t even engage in the conversation.” Sad, and tragic for so many dying people, and the families that have to endure them suffering so needlessly.
      Thanks for the instructive comment.

      1. I always find “Keep calm” is used by the wrong people.
        When something should make you angry, it’s all “Keep Calm and Carry On”, yet, when everyone is in meaningless hysterics, no one trots this out.
        I’m pro-assisted suicide, by the way. I had a conversation with someone the other day who wouldn’t hear anything other than non-consensual murder and genocide. Would not hear it.
        You just have to trust other people aren’t that stupid. But that rhetoric has the head-start: it’s emotional, it preserves the status quo, and it is already being said.

  2. Yeah, about a two-thousand year head start – but the VICE show , which tried a little too-much to be even-handed, did portray how the assisted suicide option was working in the life and death of a Dutch woman, who might have had some physical problems, but was given a psychological diagnosis to end her life. Unlike mere words, the human faces and images on the show were profoundly gripping.
    I’ll give you all the credit for talking about it with an opponent. Great blog, by the way.

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